Category Archives: Flashes and Others

Nikon MF-21 Multi-Control Back

The MF-21 is Nikon’s first multi-control back (see this for all the details on Nikon camera backs). All previous interchangeable backs are purely for data imprinting. Designed for the exclusive use by the F-801 (N8008 in North America), this back … Continue reading

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Calumet 6×7 Roll Film Holder C2

The Calumet 6×7 Roll Film Holder C2 lets one to shoot 120 medium format roll film with a large format camera (a monorail, a field camera, etc.) that is designed to use 4×5 sheet film. A near analogy of this … Continue reading

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Vivitar 285HV

Released in 2007, the Vivitar 285HV is a modernized version of the old Vivitar 285 (a sister flash of the even older 283) introduced back in 1972. Basically, it is a 285 with a triggering voltage low enough to be safe … Continue reading

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Nikon SU-4 Wireless Slave Flash Controller

The Nikon SU-4 is a dedicated optical slave for Nikon flashes. Its release predates D-TTL, i-TTL and CLS (Creative Lighting System from Nikon). However, if the the master flash (the built-in pop-up or a shoe-mounted one) and the slave unit … Continue reading

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Pentax M42 to K Mount Adapter

The original Pentax K mount was introduced in 1975 and improvements were done on the monut over the years to enable more and more automations. However, the basic mechanical specifications remain the same which allows a great amonut of backward compatibility. … Continue reading

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Nikon Extension Tube E2

Nikon Extension Tube E2 is a 14mm long semi-automatic non-meter-coupled extension tube. The E2 is part of the original Nikon F system. It is one step ahead from the fully manual K extension tube set and the predecessor of the … Continue reading

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Vivitar 283

The Vivitar 283 was introduced in 1970 and at that time, it was a high power top-of-the-line shoe-mount flash. Its thyristor circuit was extremely advanced for its time because for any film speed within its ISO range, it provides a selection of … Continue reading

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